ARCSWAT Users Manual


1. ARCSWAT GENERAL DESCRIPTION

ARCSWAT is a public domain graphical user interface program. It is designed to link the hydrologic model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) and the GIS package ARC/INFO. The development of the interface was supported by Kansas Water Office and the University of Kansas General Research Fund.

The SWAT model is limited in that it does not explicitly allow for the inclusion of spatial data as model inputs. Data must be processed into a form that the model can use. Procssing these data, even with the use of a GIS, is tedious and time comsumming due to the large number of model parameters reqiured to execute SWAT.

The development of ARCSWAT aims at an effective use of spatial data to enhance hydrological modeling. The interface performs the following tasks: (1) to streamline GIS processes tailored toward SWAT modeling needs; (2) to automate data communication between Arc/Info and SWAT; and (3) to provide a user-friendly data entry and editing environment for SWAT.

1.1. Description of SWAT and Arc/Info

SWAT is a public domain hydrologic model, developed by USDA Agricultural Research Service. It is a semi-empirical and semi-physical model. It has been used as a practical model to predict the effect of agricultural management decisions on water and sediment yields for large ungauged rural watersheds. Moreover, SWAT is an advanced lumped model or a semi-distributed model because it allows a watershed to be divided into a maximum of one hundred sub-watersheds.

SWAT consists of major water budget components such as weather, surface runoff, return flow, percolation, evapotranspiration, transmission losses, pond and reservoir storage, crop growth, irrigation water transfer, groundwater flow, and channel routing. The model runs on a daily time step for short or long term predictions and operates in a semi-distributed manner to account for spatial differences in soils, land use, crops, topography, channel morphology, and weather conditions. Using GIS data, SWAT has been applied to many major river systems in the United States with promising results.

The SWAT model requires two leves of input data: basin and subbasin. The basin level requires 12 input files: .cio (control input/ouput), .bsn (basin), .cod (control code), .fig (configuration), .lwq (lake water quality), .res (reservoir), .sta (gaged station), .tmp (temperture), .pcp (precipitation), crop.dat (crop database), till.dat (tillage database), and pest.dat (pestside database). The subbasin level includes nine input files: .sub (subbasin), .wgn (weather generator), .rte (routing), .pnd (pond), .chm (chemistry), .sol (soil), .mgt (management), .mco (management code), and .gw (ground water). Each file contains 10-20 parameters.

For more detailed information about SWAT, contact Nancy Sammons, USDA, ARS Grassland Soil & Water Research Laboratory, 808 East Blackland Road, Temple, TX 76502, phone: (817)770-6512, fax (817)770-6561, e-mail: sammons@brcsun1.tamu.edu

Arc/Info is a preporitized GIS software package developed and distruibuted by Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI). The package is widely used by government agencies, provate sectors, and universities. It offers advanced cacbilities in data management, spatial analysis, and scientific visualization. For more details contact

ESRI, 380 New York Street, Redlands, CA, 92373-8100, USA phone: 909-793-2853, fax: 909-793-5953, web site: http://www.esri.com

1.2. Conceptual Framework of the Interface

In the integration, Arc/Info serves as a "front end", by preparing spatialy explicit parameters for SWAT. SWAT runs in a manor similar to a batch operation. All parameter files must be prepared prior to the execution, and SWAT produces several output text files all at once.

Both SWAT and Arc/Info are mature and complex software systems with their own data structures and operation mechanisms; thus the two components are kept with minimal or no modifications. On this premise, the conceptual design of the interface includes an add-on external user interface and a shared internal database to couple the two software components.

1.3. General Operation

The interface SWAT/ARC consists of two major components: ARCSWAT and SWATWIN.

ARCSWAT is a graphic user interface written in AML (Arc Macro Language) that runs in the Unix environment. It uses Arc/Info coverages as input to generate many SWAT parameters (or intermediate values) as output. These output values can be read into appropriate SWAT input files through the internal database.

WINSWAT is a graphic user inerface that runs in Microsoft Windows (verson 3.1) on a PC. The development language is Visual Basic Professional, version 3.1. It takes the values generated in ARCSWAT and allows interactive data entry and editing to prepare all SWAT input files. When the parameter input is completed, SWATWIN can execute SWAT, that in turn produces model output files.

1.4. Hardware and Software Considerations

Both SWAT and Arc/Info have Unix and PC versions. SWAT/Arc uses the combiantion of PC SWAT and Unix Arc/Info because PC Arc/Info lacks functions critical for extracting spatial parameters for SWAT. Choosing the PC version of SWAT was based on the request of the program sponsors as well as the need of PC users. The current combination prefers network connections between PC and Unix for data transfer but it can also be done manually. AML is the logical choice to streamline the Arc/Info processes, and Visaul Basic is well suited for developing graphic user interfaces in the PC environment. The internal database is developed in an object oriented appraoch using the C++ programming language on a PC.

1.5 The End-User

The end-user is assumed to be a trained hydrologist, who is familiar with basic computer operation, and has basic knowledge of GIS. Experience or knowledge with Arc/Info is preferred but not necessary.

1.6 This Manual and SWAT Manual

This manual helps the user prepare SWAT input files. It is closely related to, but not a substitute for the SWAT manual. For specifics of the SWAT modeling process, the end-user must refer to the original SWAT manual.

2. OPERATION OF ARCSWAT

The primary function of ARCSWAT is to streamline GIS processes in order to extract spatialy explicit input parameters for SWAT.

2.1. Arc/Info Files

The base data sets include the following

All coveages are assumed to be in Arc/Info format, free of topological errors, and with identical projection parameters. All the recommended scales are considered appropriate for large rural watersheds, which SWAT was designed for. All of the data involved can be obtained from public domain sources such as US Geological Survey (USGS), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS),and National Climatic Data Center (NCDC).

2.2. The Main Menu

In the directory where the AMLs are located, type &r arcswat init, the main menu will appear (Figure 1).

Figure 1. The main menu.

A majority of the spatially explicit parameters required by SWAT are included in six SWAT input files: Basin (.bsn), Subbasin (.sub), Precipitation (.pcp), Temperature (.tmp), Soils (.sol), and Routing (.rte). The extraction process is thus organized into six corresponding routines. The Basin routine must be executed first, with the Subbasin routine executed next. After these two, the user can proceed or skip any one of the remaining four: Temperture, Precipitation, Soil, and Routing. An error checking mechanism warns the user whenever proper procedures are violated.

Common Elements
In the main menu and submenus, there are two buttons: OK and Cancel. Help is available at the main menu.

  • CANCEL: terminates the entire program if in the main menu. It also cleans all intermediate coverages, grids, or variables created by the executed routines. In any of the subroutines, terminates the ongoing process and goes back to the main menu.

  • OK: executes the extraction processes, generates the output ASCII files, and then cleans the workspace.

  • HELP: is availabe in the main mune. It provides detailed instructions of operation. Use the left button on the mouse to select the desired routines.
  • 2.3. BASIN

    The Basin Routine calculates basin area (DA in .bsn). This value will also be used by the SUBBASIN routine for further calculation. The user begins by choosing the appropriate directory and the basin coverage (Figure 2).

    Figure 2. Choosing the basin coverage.

    2.4. SUBBASIN

    The SUBBASIN routine calculates the following seven parameters: number of subbasins (LU in .cod), and for each subbasin: proportion of each subbasin in the basin (FLU in .sub), latitude (YLT in .wgn), channel length (CHL1 in .sub), average channel slope (CHS in .sub), average slope length (SL in .sub), and average slope steepness (STP in .sub).

    The user begins by selecting the appropriate subbasin coverage (Figure 3).

    Figure 3. Choosing subbasin coverage.

    When the subbasin map is displayed, the user has the option to process all subbasins or selected subbasins (see Figure 4).

    Figure 4. Selecting subbasins.

    The user needs to number each selected subbasin. The numbers will be carried to WINSWAT and used in SWAT modeling (Figure 5).

    Figure 5. Assigning subbasin numbers.

    The user needs to select the appropriate primary stream, all-stream, and elevation lattice in the following windows, repectively (see Figures 6, 7, and 8).

    Figure 6. Selecting primary streams coverage.

    Figure 7. Selecting all streams coverage.

    Figure 8. Selecting elevation grid.

    The user needs to identify whether an elevation lattice exist for individual subbasins (Figure 9) If they are not available, ARCSWAT will clip the elevation lattice by each subbasin.

    Figure 9. Selecting elevation grid for subbasins.

    Among the seven parameters, number of subbasins (LU), proportion of basin each subbasin occupies (FLU), and subbasin latitude (YLT) are caulated in a straightforward fashion. However, the remining four variables, channel length, average channel slope, average slope length, and average slope steepness, involve various methods.

    To determine channel length (CHL1), the user needs to select the stream segments that connect the subbasin outlet to the most distant point in the subbasin. The longest stream is recommended (Figure 10).

    Figure 10. Selecting the longest channel.

    The user can re-select the stream reach if previously selected stream segments are incorrect (Figure 11).

    Figure 11. Re-selecting the longest channel.

    An error checking mechanism warns the user if the selected segments are discontinuous. During this process, the headwater and outlet of each subbasin are also determined. This information will be used, in concert with the elevation lattice and the calculated channel length, to determine the average channel slope (CHS).

    The average slope length (SL) and average slope steepness (STP) are calculated using a method described by Williams and Berndt (1976): l = 0.5 * DA/LCH (1); S = 0.25 * Z (LC25 + LC50 + LC75) / DA (2) where l is the average slope length; DA is the area of the subbasin; LCH is the total length of channels in the subbasin; S is the average slope steepness; Z is the elevation range in the subbasin; and LC25, LC50, and LC75 are the lengths of the contour lines generated at 25, 50, and 75 percent of the total elevation range in each subbasin, respectively.

    2.5. TEMPERATURE and PRECIPITATION

    The user needs to select the appropriate precipitation and temperature coverages (Figures 12 and 13).

    Figure 12. Selecting precipitation coverage.

    Figure 13. Selecting temperature coverage.

    The temperature and precipitation data at the weather stations are interpolated by Thiessen polygons. The proportion of each Thiessen polygon in each subbasin is calculated, and stored in an output ASCII file along with the station ID for further calculations.

    2.6. SOILS

    The user needs to select the appropriate soils coverage (figure 14). The interface is hard coded for STATSGO soil data.

    Figure 14. Selecting soils coverage.

    The percentage of each soil series in each soil association polygon, the proportion of each soil association polygon in each subbasin, and the MUID are stored in an output file for further calculations.

    2.7. ROUTING

    This routine calculates channel slope (CHSS in .rte) and channel length (CHL2 in .rte). To determine channel length (CHL2), the user needs to select stream segments from the subbasin outlet to the basin outlet (Figure 15).

    Figure 15. Selecting channel length..

    The user can re-select the stream segements if previously selected ones are incorrect. An error checking mechanism warns the user if the selected segments are discontinuous. During this process, the locations of subbasin outlet and the basin outlet are also determined. Those data will be used, in concert with the elevation lattice and the calculated channel length, to determine the average channel slope (CHSS).

    When ROUTING routine is complete, select OK to clean all intermediate coveages, grids, and variables, and produce output files.

    3. THE OUTPUT FILES

    ARCSWAT produces two output ASCII files: arcswat.dat and arcswat.sol. If the files already exist, the command screen prompts the user for additional file names.

    3.1. arcswat.dat

    The following is an example of arcswat.dat, demonstrating the content and format of the file. The numbers at the begining of each line are added in this document for descriptive convenience. The capitalized abbreviation refer to either the input file extension (see section 1.1.) or the parameters name (see sections 2.2. to 2.6.).

    1:   COD, LU, 2
    2:   BSN, DA, 5137.18016
    3:   1
    4:   PCP, 5
    5:   14068202, 0.5833858324863
    6:   14724802, 0.0541097856222
    7:   14176502, 0.3370643940133
    8:   14159302, 0.0020507908114
    9:   14176702, 0.0233447255548
    10: TMP, 5
    11: 14068202, 0.6591011776356
    12: 14176902, 0.2594612518915
    13: 14159302, 0.0020059648452
    14: 14176702, 0.0773582288017
    15: 14159302, 0.002108974921
    16: WGN, YLT, 39.7430529581
    17: SUB, FLU, 0.1101166494969, CHL1, 67.55496484375
    18: CHS, 1.58389542867, SL,391912.2956727
    19: STP, 6.783539850816
    20: RTE, CHSS,  ,CHL2, 142.4102543945
    21: 2
    22: ......
    23: ......

    line1:   COD, LU, number of subbasins (2)
    line2:   BSN, DA, basin area
    line3:   subbasin number # (1)
    line4:   PCP, number of precipitation polygons (5) in subbasin number # (1)
    line5:   polygon1 ID, percetage of area of the polygon1 in the subbasin
    line6:   polygon2 ID, percetage of area of the polygon2 in the subbasin
    line7:   polygon3 ID, percetage of area of the polygon3 in the subbasin
    line8:   polygon4 ID, percetage of area of the polygon4 in the subbasin
    line9:   polygon5 ID, percetage of area of the polygon5 in the subbasin
    line10: TMP, number of temperature polygons (5) in subbasin number # (1)
    line11: polygon1 ID, percetage of area of the polygon1 in the subbasin
    line12: polygon2 ID, percetage of area of the polygon2 in the subbasin
    line13: polygon3 ID, percetage of area of the polygon3 in the subbasin
    line14: polygon4 ID, percetage of area of the polygon4 in the subbasin
    line15: polygon5 ID, percetage of area of the polygon5 in the subbasin
    line16: WGN, YLT, latitude of the subbasin
    line17: SUB, FLU, proportion of basin each subbasin occupies, CHL1, channel length
    line18: CHS, average channel slope, SL, average slope length
    line19: STP, average slope steepness
    line20: RTE, CHSS, average channel slope for routing, CHL2, channel length for routing
    line21: subbasin number # (2)
    line22: ......
    line23: ......

    3.2. arcswat.sol

    The file arcswat.sol contains the output associated with soils parameters. Its basic format is as following:

    SOL, number of soils associtions in the first subbasin (10)
    MUID1, fraction of the soils association polygon in the subbasin, number of soils series in the soils           association polygon (15)
    s5id1, percent of the soils series in the soils association, soils series name
    s5id2, ......, ......
    ......
    s5id15, percent of the soils series in the soils associationn, soils series name
    MUID2, fraction, #
    s5id1, ......, ......
    ......
    s5id#, ......, ......
    MUID3, ......, ......
    ......
    MUID15, fraction, #
    s5id1, ......, ......
    ......
    s5id#, ......, ......
    SOL, number of soils associations in the second subbasin (2)
    MUID1, ......, ......
    ......
    MUID10, ......, ......
    ......


    Example file:
    SOL,10 //subbasin1 SOL, number of soils association
    KS116,0.282391695907,15 //MUID1, fraction of the subbasin, number of soils series
    IA0070,7,KENNEBEC //s5id, percent of association, soil series name
    IA0135,2,BREMER
    IA0203,35,GOSPORT
    KS0106,14,SOGN
    IA0018,2,JUDSON
    IA0070,4,KENNEBEC
    MO0083,2,KNOX
    MO0083,3,KNOX
    IA0019,14,LADOGA
    KS0072,6,MARTIN
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    NE0076,3,PAWNEE
    NE0076,1,PAWNEE
    IA0033,2,SHARPSBURG
    KS0118,3,WELDA
    KS146,0.3381060066788,17 //MUID2, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0544,16,CLARINDA
    IA0033,14,SHARPSBURG
    MO0094,11,HIGGINSVILLE
    IA0020,8,MACKSBURG
    IA0020,11,MACKSBURG
    KS0089,1,OSKA
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    MO0001,2,GRUNDY
    IA0019,2,LADOGA
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    MO0067,3,POLO
    MO0020,1,LAGONDA
    IA0296,1,COLO
    IA0141,1,NODAWAY
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    KS161,0.1890942246391,19 //MUID3, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    KS0021,6,CLARESON
    OK0096,1,ERAM
    KS0023,11,CLIME
    KS0106,4,SOGN
    OK0004,4,DENNIS
    OK0096,8,ERAM
    OK0096,2,ERAM
    KS0142,11,KENOMA
    KS0145,3,LEBO
    OK0015,2,SUMMIT
    OK0008,1,LULA
    OK0015,8,SUMMIT
    KS0114,2,VERDIGRIS
    KS0119,1,WOODSON
    KS0058,19,KENOMA
    KS0058,7,KENOMA
    KS0058,3,KENOMA
    KS0054,4,IVAN
    KS0062,3,LABETTE
    KS142,0.0915667656721,14 //MUID4, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,8,KENNEBEC
    KS0119,6,WOODSON
    IA0070,2,KENNEBEC
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,22,MARTIN
    KS0212,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,3,MARTIN
    KS0106,6,SOGN
    KS0115,19,VINLAND
    KS0089,11,OSKA
    KS0104,3,SIBLEYVILLE
    KS0115,7,VINLAND
    KS0115,5,VINLAND
    NE0076,4,PAWNEE
    KS116,0.0017584911875,15 //MUID5, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,7,KENNEBEC
    IA0135,2,BREMER
    IA0203,35,GOSPORT
    KS0106,14,SOGN
    IA0018,2,JUDSON
    IA0070,4,KENNEBEC
    MO0083,2,KNOX
    MO0083,3,KNOX
    IA0019,14,LADOGA
    KS0072,6,MARTIN
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    NE0076,3,PAWNEE
    NE0076,1,PAWNEE
    IA0033,2,SHARPSBURG
    KS0118,3,WELDA
    KS194,0.065689825265,6 //MUID6, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    MO0011,44,WABASH
    KS0095,23,READING
    IA0070,15,KENNEBEC
    IA0018,11,JUDSON
    KS0019,6,CHASE
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    KS201,0.0311521525056,16 //MUID7, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    OK0011,30,PARSONS
    KS0058,27,KENOMA
    OK0004,12,DENNIS
    OK0064,3,CATOOSA
    OK0167,3,APPERSON
    KS0114,4,VERDIGRIS
    KS0020,3,CHEROKEE
    KS0120,3,ZAAR
    OK0096,1,ERAM
    MO0032,6,BARDEN
    MO0032,1,BARDEN
    KS0050,1,HEPLER
    OK0002,1,COLLINSVILLE
    MO0010,2,DEEPWATER
    KS0007,1,BATES
    OK0015,2,SUMMIT
    KS142,0.0001668672246,14 //MUID8, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,8,KENNEBEC
    KS0119,6,WOODSON
    IA0070,2,KENNEBEC
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,22,MARTIN
    KS0212,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,3,MARTIN
    KS0106,6,SOGN
    KS0115,19,VINLAND
    KS0089,11,OSKA
    KS0104,3,SIBLEYVILLE
    KS0115,7,VINLAND
    KS0115,5,VINLAND
    NE0076,4,PAWNEE
    KS142,0.0000489369043,14 //MUID9, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,8,KENNEBEC
    KS0119,6,WOODSON
    IA0070,2,KENNEBEC
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,22,MARTIN
    KS0212,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,3,MARTIN
    KS0106,6,SOGN
    KS0115,19,VINLAND
    KS0089,11,OSKA
    KS0104,3,SIBLEYVILLE
    KS0115,7,VINLAND
    KS0115,5,VINLAND
    NE0076,4,PAWNEE
    KS142,0.0000292786398,14 //MUID10, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,8,KENNEBEC
    KS0119,6,WOODSON
    IA0070,2,KENNEBEC
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,22,MARTIN
    KS0212,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,3,MARTIN
    KS0106,6,SOGN
    KS0115,19,VINLAND
    KS0089,11,OSKA
    KS0104,3,SIBLEYVILLE
    KS0115,7,VINLAND
    KS0115,5,VINLAND
    NE0076,4,PAWNEE
    SOL,8 //subbain2 SOl, number of soils associations
    KS116,0.1267554759209,15 //MUID1, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG //s5id, percentage, soils series name
    IA0070,7,KENNEBEC
    IA0135,2,BREMER
    IA0203,35,GOSPORT
    KS0106,14,SOGN
    IA0018,2,JUDSON
    IA0070,4,KENNEBEC
    MO0083,2,KNOX
    MO0083,3,KNOX
    IA0019,14,LADOGA
    KS0072,6,MARTIN
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    NE0076,3,PAWNEE
    NE0076,1,PAWNEE
    IA0033,2,SHARPSBURG
    KS0118,3,WELDA
    KS116,0.0026929217955,15 //MUID2, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,7,KENNEBEC
    IA0135,2,BREMER
    IA0203,35,GOSPORT
    KS0106,14,SOGN
    IA0018,2,JUDSON
    IA0070,4,KENNEBEC
    MO0083,2,KNOX
    MO0083,3,KNOX
    IA0019,14,LADOGA
    KS0072,6,MARTIN
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    NE0076,3,PAWNEE
    NE0076,1,PAWNEE
    IA0033,2,SHARPSBURG
    KS0118,3,WELDA
    KS142,0.3510941902822,14 //MUID3, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,8,KENNEBEC
    KS0119,6,WOODSON
    IA0070,2,KENNEBEC
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,22,MARTIN
    KS0212,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,3,MARTIN
    KS0106,6,SOGN
    KS0115,19,VINLAND
    KS0089,11,OSKA
    KS0104,3,SIBLEYVILLE
    KS0115,7,VINLAND
    KS0115,5,VINLAND
    NE0076,4,PAWNEE
    KS116,0.1340264021893,15 //MUID4 fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,7,KENNEBEC
    IA0135,2,BREMER
    IA0203,35,GOSPORT
    KS0106,14,SOGN
    IA0018,2,JUDSON
    IA0070,4,KENNEBEC
    MO0083,2,KNOX
    MO0083,3,KNOX
    IA0019,14,LADOGA
    KS0072,6,MARTIN
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    NE0076,3,PAWNEE
    NE0076,1,PAWNEE
    IA0033,2,SHARPSBURG
    KS0118,3,WELDA
    KS142,0.2729071047375,14 //MUID5, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0070,8,KENNEBEC
    KS0119,6,WOODSON
    IA0070,2,KENNEBEC
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,22,MARTIN
    KS0212,2,MARTIN
    KS0072,3,MARTIN
    KS0106,6,SOGN
    KS0115,19,VINLAND
    KS0089,11,OSKA
    KS0104,3,SIBLEYVILLE
    KS0115,7,VINLAND
    KS0115,5,VINLAND
    NE0076,4,PAWNEE
    KS146,0.072561966746,17 //MUID6, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0544,16,CLARINDA
    IA0033,14,SHARPSBURG
    MO0094,11,HIGGINSVILLE
    IA0020,8,MACKSBURG
    IA0020,11,MACKSBURG
    KS0089,1,OSKA
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    MO0001,2,GRUNDY
    IA0019,2,LADOGA
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    MO0067,3,POLO
    MO0020,1,LAGONDA
    IA0296,1,COLO
    IA0141,1,NODAWAY
    KS0089,2,OSKA
    KS194,0.036952970072,6 //MUID7, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    MO0011,44,WABASH
    KS0095,23,READING
    IA0070,15,KENNEBEC
    IA0018,11,JUDSON
    KS0019,6,CHASE
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    KS146,0.0030331849373,17 //MUID8, fraction, number of soils series
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0033,23,SHARPSBURG
    IA0544,16,CLARINDA
    IA0033,14,SHARPSBURG
    MO0094,11,HIGGINSVILLE
    IA0020,8,MACKSBURG
    IA0020,11,MACKSBURG
    KS0089,1,OSKA
    KS0072,2,MARTIN
    MO0001,2,GRUNDY
    IA0019,2,LADOGA
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    IA0070,1,KENNEBEC
    MO0067,3,POLO
    MO0020,1,LAGONDA
    IA0296,1,COLO
    IA0141,1,NODAWAY
    KS0089,2,OSKA